SOLD OUT: North Korea's Political Transition and Implications for Engagement

SOLD OUT: North Korea's Political Transition and Implications for Engagement

Kim Jong Un (C), dubbed the "Great Successor" to Kim Jong Il (not pictured), visits Mokran Video Company in Pyongyang in this undated picture released by the North's official KCNA news agency on Sept. 11, 2011.

HBO Hotspots Series

This program is now sold out.

Ambassador Stephen W. Bosworth, formerly the United States’ Special Representative for North Korea Policy, and Charles K. Armstrong, Asia Society Associate Fellow and Professor of Korean Studies at Columbia University, will discuss North Korea's political transition, U.S. engagement, and the threat posed by the country's nuclear program.

Ambassador Bosworth is the Dean of the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. Prior to his appointment at the Fletcher School, he served as the United States Ambassador to the Republic of Korea from November 1997 to February 2001. From 1995-1997, he was the Executive Director of the Korean Peninsula Energy Development Organization [KEDO], an inter-governmental organization established by the United States, the Republic of Korea, and Japan. Bosworth is the recipient of numerous awards, including the American Academy of Diplomacy’s Diplomat of the Year Award in 1987 and the Department of State’s Distinguished Service Award in 1976.

Professor Armstrong is a frequent commentator in the US and international media on Korean, East Asian, and Asian-American affairs.  A specialist in the modern history of Korea and East Asia, he has published several books on contemporary Korea, including The Koreas (Routledge, 2007), The North Korean Revolution, 1945-1950 (Cornell, 2003), Korea at the Center: Dynamics of Regionalism in Northeast Asia (M.E. Sharpe, 2006), and Korean Society: Civil Society, Democracy, and the State (Routledge, second edition 2006), as well as numerous journal articles and book chapters. His current book projects include a study of North Korean foreign relations in the Cold War era and a history of modern East Asia.

Can't make it to this program? Tune into AsiaSociety.org/Live at 6:30 pm ET for a free live video webcast. Online viewers are encouraged to submit questions to [email protected] during the webcast.

Event Details

23 January 2012
6:30pm - 8:30pm

725 Park Avenue, New York, NY

Members: $10; Students/Seniors: $12; Nonmembers: $15