'Freedom to Create' Exhibition

'Freedom to Create' Exhibition

"This is one of the most informative and eye opening art exhibitions I have ever seen. Perhaps as the 2010 Freedom to Create exhibition tours the world, the disarray of mankind will shed light on issues that should no longer be kept silent. I highly recommend this exhibit as an important experience and a lesson in gratitude no matter where you are."
— Suzanna Bowling, Times Square Chronicles, New York

The Freedom to Create exhibition combines powerful art with important messaging, bringing global issues to local communities and is a manifestation of how creativity is being used to drive social change around the world. The exhibition addresses the importance of empowering dreams to transform lives, and celebrates the power of art to confront barriers to prosperity. Central to our work is the belief that communities themselves hold the power to creatively address and find solutions to the issues that our exhibitions bring to light.

Freedom to Create exhibitions also offer participating artists an opportunity to share their work on an international platform. Previous Freedom to Create exhibitions have been held in London, New York, Harare, Kabul, and Cairo.

Abir Abdullah, Bangladesh, "Shattered Faces" (Photography)
Abir’s graphic photographs portray the horrific, disfiguring consequence of acid attacks by men in Bangladesh on women who rejected their sexual advances or marriage proposals. The disfigured faces and shattered lives of these courageous women are sensitively captured in these haunting images. Abir is working to raise awareness of the brutality of acid attacks on helpless women. Through his photography he hopes to educate men to refrain from taking such a cruel and extreme step. He hopes that the emotional impact of his photographs will inspire everyone to fight against this barbaric form of domestic violence.

Owen Maseko, Zimbabwe, "Gukurahundi" (Installation Art)
The 5th Brigade, also referred to as the "Gukurahundi," are renowned for atrocities committed in Zimbabwe in the 1980s under Robert Mugabe. Communities are still nervous about discussing the incident publicly or commemorating the missing. Artist Owen Maseko uses his exhibit to break the silence surrounding the conflict and the "hidden history" of Zimbabwe. Owen expresses the horrors of the Gukurahundi through his painting, graffiti and 3D installations, with the hope that greater openness about the massacres will lead to reconciliation and national healing. He believes it is important for victims to have their suffering recognised through public discourse and that acknowledgement of past misdeeds is made.

Email: [email protected] Telephone (Gallery): +91 22 2202 3030

Event Details

19 May 2011
7:00pm - 8:30pm

Galerie Mirchandani+Steinruecke, 2 Sunny House, 16/18 Mereweather Road, Behind Taj Mahal Hotel, Colaba, Mumbai 400 001