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Keyword: china

2011: A Year Sans Global Leadership

On top? Chinese Yuan notes photographed in March 2011. China pointedly declined to provide direct financial assistance to Europe in late 2011. (Flickr/Sharon Drummond)
Policy

Though it wasn't always obvious, the main international migraine of this year was the European debt crisis. The crisis left the station in 2009 and was rolling all through 2010, but it really picked up steam this year. In effect, 2011 was the year it went from being about Greece to being about Europe and, potentially, the world as a whole.

2011: South Korea's Lee Myung-bak is One Man Washington Can Agree On

In Washington, Lee Myung-bak (L), President of the Republic of Korea, begins his address to Congress, with Vice President Joe Biden and Speaker John Boehner (R) behind him, on Oct. 13, 2011. (Flickr/SpeakerBoehner)
Policy

Americans say in poll after poll that they yearn for a leader who will come to Washington, cut through the gridlock, and get the nation’s business done. This year, that leader arrived — South Korean President Lee Myung-bak.

Whiting: During This DPRK Changeover, South Koreans Not Hoarding Rice

Residents walk past newspapers showing the late North Korean leader Kim Jong-Il and his son Kim Jong-Un outside a convenience store in Seoul on December 20, 2011. (Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

When long-time North Korean dictator Kim Il Sung died in 1994, nervous South Koreans rushed to the stores and hoarded basic necessities such as rice, canned meat and instant noodles in fear of another Korean War. The "Great Leader" was dead and his son, Kim Jong Il was taking over. This was uncharted territory.

French: Why Kim Jong Un Should Mourn Until 2013

Kim Jong Un (C), dubbed the
Policy

Paul French, author of North Korea: The Paranoid Peninsula, says "we shouldn't expect anything of substance to come out of Pyongyang for a year."

Gilholm: Kim Jong Il's Death Reduces Regime's Life Expectancy

A portrait of the late Kim Jong Il in Pyongyang, North Korea. (Joseph A Ferris III/Flickr)
Policy

Kim Jong Il's reported death on December 17 is the biggest shock to the country's regime since the passing of his father in 1994. Forecasting what will happen to an authoritarian regime after a leadership succession is inherently rather speculative, and nowhere is this more true than in North Korea. However, we can venture a few observations, and in very broad terms estimate the probability of various types of scenarios.

Stumpf: Kim Jong Il's Death an Opportunity for US, China

The front pages of Tokyo's major evening newspapers report the death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il on December 19, 2011 in Tokyo. (Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

It would be understandable if, observing the post-Kim Jong Il era, the United States, China, South Korea and Japan saw more peril than promise. However, the history of North Korean negotiation indicates a small possibility of progress toward peace on the Korean peninsula and North Korea’s denuclearization.

Lintner: North Korea's King is Dead, But the Military Still Rules

North Korean leader Kim Jong Il waves from a car after the meeting with Russian President Dmitry Medvedev at Sosnovy Bor Military Garrison, Zaigrayevsky District, Buryatia outside Ulan-Ude on August 24, 2011. (Dmitry Astakhov/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

The King is dead! Long live the King! The old European cry when a monarch died and a new one took over was meant to prevent any argument over succession and make sure the throne was never empty. And this could just as well apply to North Korea today. Kim Jong Il had already a year before he died anointed his successor, his youngest son Kim Jong Un.

Experts React: North Korea's Kim Jong Il Dead at 69

The flag of the Democratic Republic of Korea (DPRK) flies at half-mast in front of the embassy in Berlin December 19, 2011, following the death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il.  (John MacDougall/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

Asia Society Associate Fellows Charles Armstrong and John Delury offer instant analysis on the death of Kim Jong Il and its implications for the region.

Kulma: Kim Jong Il's Death Adds to Regional Uncertainty

A South Korean activist paints on a caricature of Kim Jong Un, the youngest son and heir-apparent of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il, during a rally denouncing the communist country's third-generation dynastic succession in Seoul on October 14, 2010. (Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

The news out of North Korea that leader Kim Jong Il has died, while surprising, is not completely unexpected. Faced with serious health concerns over the last few years, the North Korean leader began to put in place a plan for his son to take over the reins of power.

Interview: NPR's Louisa Lim on Her Encounter With China's 'Wolf Dad'

Xiao Baiyou, China's
Lifestyle

A 47-year-old father of four known as "Wolf Dad" is causing a stir in China for parenting practices that that make "Tiger Mom" Amy Chua [photo] look like Mary Poppins.