Worldwide Locations

Worldwide Locations

Keyword: china

2011: Five Big China Stories (That Didn't Happen in China)

What do riots in London mean to leaders in Beijing? (Flickr/rorymizen)
Policy

It is crucial not to overlook things that happen elsewhere that change the state of play within Chinese political life, writes Jeffrey Wasserstrom.

2012: The Year Mandarin Chinese Becomes a 'Commonly Taught Language'?

A student at Aiton Elementary School in Washington, D.C., practices Chinese. (Grace Norman)
Education

U.S. schools are beginning to see the value in teaching the world's most commonly spoken language. And hopefully the reasons are not just economic, writes Chris Livaccari.

Jae-Seung Lee: The Moment of Truth for the Two Koreas

(Flickr/mag3737)
Policy

Kim Jong Il's death has created a critical opportunity for the two Koreas to figure out a roadmap for the coming years, writes Korea University's Jae-Seung Lee.

Vishakha Desai: Will Asia Be One?

Statue of Indian poet, playwright, musician, and artist Rabindranath Tagore (1861–1941) at Tagore House in Kolkata. (kittell/Flickr)
Policy

A century after leading intellectuals first articulated a notion of Asian identity, writes Asia Society's President, it has the potential to become true.

2011: Google Zeitgeist, How Asia Searched the World

Lifestyle

The internet giant released its annual survey of popular global search terms. Find out what people and events ranked highest in China, India, Japan, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, and more.

Lee: With Kim Jong Il Dead, a Chance to Normalize Inter-Korean Relations

Kim Il Sung (L) and Kim Jong Il are pictured in this piece of propaganda art photographed in North Korea. (Flickr/yeowatzup)
Policy

Kim Jong Il is dead. While it is never clear whether history creates a leader, or a leader creates history, one thing is clear: The more a leader dominates power over a nation, the more its regime's fate will be changed by that leader’s death. So where is North Korea headed after Kim Jong Il’s death?

2011: A Return to Roots? Lessons From This Year's US Engagement in Asia

U.S. President Barack Obama (2nd R) applauds with Southeast Asian leaders, Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono (L), Philippines President Benigno Aquino (2nd L) and Brunei Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah (R), during a group photo session for the leaders of the East Asia Summit in Nusa Dua on Indonesia's resort island of Bali on November 19, 2011 following the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Summit. (Romeo Gacad/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

This is part of a series of year-end posts on Asia Blog written by Asia Society experts and Associate Fellows looking back on noteworthy events in 2011. You can read the entire series here.

2011: A Year Sans Global Leadership

On top? Chinese Yuan notes photographed in March 2011. China pointedly declined to provide direct financial assistance to Europe in late 2011. (Flickr/Sharon Drummond)
Policy

Though it wasn't always obvious, the main international migraine of this year was the European debt crisis. The crisis left the station in 2009 and was rolling all through 2010, but it really picked up steam this year. In effect, 2011 was the year it went from being about Greece to being about Europe and, potentially, the world as a whole.

2011: South Korea's Lee Myung-bak is One Man Washington Can Agree On

In Washington, Lee Myung-bak (L), President of the Republic of Korea, begins his address to Congress, with Vice President Joe Biden and Speaker John Boehner (R) behind him, on Oct. 13, 2011. (Flickr/SpeakerBoehner)
Policy

Americans say in poll after poll that they yearn for a leader who will come to Washington, cut through the gridlock, and get the nation’s business done. This year, that leader arrived — South Korean President Lee Myung-bak.

Whiting: During This DPRK Changeover, South Koreans Not Hoarding Rice

Residents walk past newspapers showing the late North Korean leader Kim Jong-Il and his son Kim Jong-Un outside a convenience store in Seoul on December 20, 2011. (Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

When long-time North Korean dictator Kim Il Sung died in 1994, nervous South Koreans rushed to the stores and hoarded basic necessities such as rice, canned meat and instant noodles in fear of another Korean War. The "Great Leader" was dead and his son, Kim Jong Il was taking over. This was uncharted territory.