Worldwide Locations

Worldwide Locations

Category: Policy

Interview: Arvind Subramanian on a Dominant China

U.S. President Barack Obama (R) looks on as his Chinese counterpart Hu Jintao answers a question during a press conference in the East Room at the White House in Washington, DC, on January 19, 2011. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

Author of Eclipse: Living in the Shadow of China's Economic Dominance suggests the era of Chinese economic leadership may already be upon us.

When the 'Asian Way' Can Be the Wrong Way

Mongolian President President Tsakhia Elbegdorj at Asia Society New York on Sept. 19, 2011. (Suzanna Finley/Asia Society)
Policy

Originally published in the Bangkok Post, Oct. 11, 2011

East Asian countries are well-known for nationalist policies that coalesce around single ethnicities, or in the case of Singapore, recognition of diversity, but careful management of diversity in the name of a higher national calling.

Yangzom Brauen: 'Across Many Mountains' to Speak for Tibet

Yangzom Brauen, author of <i>Across Many Mountains</i>.
Policy

Yangzom Brauen's new family memoir Across Many Mountains tells the harrowing yet ultimately inspirational story of her grandmother and mother's life in Tibet and their subsequent escape and exile after the Tibetan independence movement was suppressed by Chairman Mao's Red Army.

What Do You Know About Afghanistan?

(Courtesy Williams Afghan Media Project)
Policy

The average American cannot find Afghanistan on a map, despite a painful decade of war there.

Does a New Biography Tell the Whole Story on Deng Xiaoping?

Deng Xiaoping (1904-1997).
Policy

Deng Xiaoping once appraised the rule of his predecessor as China's paramount leader, Mao Zedong, as being "70 percent positive and 30 percent negative". How would Deng's own performance in office be assessed?  A new biography by the Harvard professor Ezra Vogel attempts to answer this question, through using (fortunately) more sophisticated tools than mere mathematical formulae.

Tensions Mount, but the US and Pakistan Are Stuck With Each Other

Pakistani patients affected with dengue fever lie on beds in a ward at the hospital in Lahore on September 7, 2011. (Arif Ali/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

Tensions between the U.S. and Pakistan appear to be increasing with every new statement by officials on either side. The media in both countries, with few exceptions, are also hurling accusations and supporting their respective state apparatus. Interestingly, Washington and Islamabad keep reiterating that both countries and their common fight against terror are important to each other — and yet relations are deteriorating.

US Ambassador Marc Grossman on US-Pakistan Relations, Terrorism and Rabbani's Death

Policy

"Pakistanis have some decisions to make about their future," said U.S. Special Envoy for Pakistan and Afghanistan Marc Grossman in an exclusive interview with Asia Society's Vice President of Global Policy Programs Suzanne DiMaggio.

"If they come to a realization that terrorism and extremism is a threat to them, they will be looking for ways to work with us to end this threat to Pakistan, to Pakistanis, to Pakistani society," he said.

Q&A: Nobel Prize Winning Economist Amartya Sen on Reviving Nalanda University

 Indian Nobel Laureate and noted economist Amartya Sen delivers an address in New Delhi on  January 27, 2004. (Prakash Singh/AFP/Getty)
Policy

As an Indian Nobel Prize winning economist, philosopher and humanitarian, Amartya Sen is an intellectual force who needs little introduction. As a young boy, he was influenced by the suffering he witnessed during the 1943 Bengal Famine and the India-Pakistan partition. Sen has influenced the creation of the United Nations' Human Development Index and he has deepened and expanded discourse in fields ranging from social choice and welfare economics to human rights and justice.

Video: Nobel Prize Winner Amartya Sen Responds to Nalanda University Critics

Policy

In an exclusive interview at Asia Society in New York (embedded below), Nobel Prize-winning economist Amartya Sen responded to news that former Indian president APJ Abdul Kalam would no longer be associated with the revival of Nalanda University, one of the oldest universities in the world.

Sen said the position of "visitor" — responsible for monitoring and reviewing the functions of a university in India — is meant to be held by the current president. "Now," Sen said, "Dr. Kalam decided that since he’s no longer president it would be only appropriate that it should go to the present president."

President Pratibha Devisingh Patil has agreed to be visitor, he said.

He also stressed that Nalanda is still in a "formative" stage. He added, "There has to be some kind of intelligent merging of the short-run challenges with the long-run challenges to be met."

Podcast: Ashis Nandy and Pakistan's 'Latent Potential'

Ashis Nandy in New Delhi, summer 2011.
Policy

This is the latest installment of a series of podcasts entitled Another Pakistan, a co-production of the Asia Society and the Watson Institute at Brown University, with support on the ground from Aman ki Asha. Click here to learn more. Scroll to the end of this post to listen to the podcast.