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Death of Wang Bei and China's Risky Plastic Surgery Craze




Wang Bei, 24, who hoped to become a pop star in China, died on the operating table when a cosmetic surgery procedure on her face went wrong. (Independent.co.uk)

Wang Bei, 24, who hoped to become a pop star in China, died on the operating table when a cosmetic surgery procedure on her face went wrong. (Independent.co.uk)

China's obsession with using cosmetic surgery to enhance body image raises bigger, more important questions.

Going under the knife to change your look is big business in China. Often clinics offer services based on Western ideals of beauty and run advertisements using Caucasian, rather than Chinese models.

Anecdotal evidence suggests eye-lid surgeries, nose jobs, skin lightening procedures, and body-lengthening surgeries have been most popular. 

Looking "less Asian" is the newest craze in China and some other Asian countries. But as demand has grown, so have the risks.

Chinese Super Girl beauty Wang Bei, 24, recently died during "facial bone-grinding surgery."  

Why would such a famous and attractive star (who had won the Chinese equivalent of American Idol) opt for plastic surgery? That Wang even felt she needed to improve her looks has underlined the extent to which cosmetic surgery has taken hold.

If being born Asian is making young men and women think they are "racially inferior," then restrictions should be placed on what it takes to go under the knife for beauty enhancement. Moreover, schooling and parenting should include new and better ways to promote self-esteem. But that's just my opinion.

How do you feel about plastic surgery for personal beauty? Share your thoughts in the comments section below: